About your Search

20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17
corporations to pay their fair share. we voted on an approach that puts our economy first and foremost and makes sure that we are protecting, not threatening our fragile economic recovery. that is the kind of approach that is supported by the vast majority of the american people and the senate stood strongly behind that. mr. president, the senate strongly rejected the budget that passed the house of representatives yesterday. their budget would meet the goal by balancing by an arbitrary date but would do it in a way that would be devastating for our families and the economy, dismantling medicare and ending up cutting taxes for the rich while raising them on the middle class. and not only that, but it did rely on gimmicks and tricks to hit that arbitrary date. there is nothing balanced about that kind of approach, and i'm very glad that every member of the senate had an opportunity to be clear about where we stand on that. mr. president, the senate also voted yesterday to specifically reject the idea that medicare should be dismantled or voucherrized. i'm glad we had strong bipartisan s
of the gridlock and dysfunction here in washington, d.c. they can see that our economy is slowly getting back on its feet, businesses are beginning to hire more workers, but my constituents and people across the country are very frustrated that the constant political crises are holding our recovery back right when we need to be doing everything possible to support it. after two years of debate about fiscal and economic policy and an election in which voters spoke loudly and clearly, the american people want their elected representatives to stop arguing and reach some solutions. mr. president, i come to the floor today to discuss a budget plan that meets this challenge. the senate budget that passed through the budget committee last week with the strong support of all ten democrats and two independents. it is a responsible and balanced plan that puts the economy first and tackles our deficit and debt responsibly and credibly, and i am hopeful that after it passes the senate, the house of representatives stands ready to compromise as well and we can come together around a balanced and bipartisa
the economy grow more and more jobs be created because we have had the slowest recovery during this recession since any time after the world war ii, at least. very, very slow. but we have done something to a degree we have never done before, and that is borrow and spend to stimulate the economy. and someone has compared borrowing and spending to stimulate the economy to the idea of someone taking a bucket, scooping up water in one end of the swimming pool and pouring it into the other. you have got no net gain. the truth is you lose some of the water out of the bucket as you walk along the shore. in this case what we lose is, we lose interest on that debt indefinitely because there's no plan to pay down the debt. so this budget that's before us today does not balance, it does not put us on a sound path, it does not create confidence in the -- among the american citizens that the future is going to be sound, that we've gotten this country reoriented in a way that's going to produce long-term growth. indeed, it's going to do exactly the opposite. it's going to do exactly the opposite. it's goin
we all want to go. wwe want to have a growing economy, weal we want to deal with our deficit. these are challenging, complex goals. we can get there. even the action of this body last night in passing the fyn.2013 appropriations bill shows we can cooperate together and with the thousands get there. it is my hope that that will inspire us going forward. the question is this: we all agree that what has been done thus far in the area of deficit reduction equates to about $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction that has been done by the last congress, including the deal on the bush tax cuts that were made at year end. $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction over the next ten years. and all also agree that $is.8is- that $1.8 trillion was gutting expenses and a little more than $600 billion of this was revenues achieved through the year-end bush tax cut deal. so everwhelmingly what has been done thus far has been in spending cuts rather than new revenues. it is very important for us to know that. it is very important for folks to realize that democrats are willing to make are hard calls abo
, it impacts our economy in a very significantly negative way. all we have to do is look across the atlantic at europe and what's happening there to get a glimpse of the crisis that can come from not dealing with ever-increasing debt and not taking steps necessary over a period of time to put your country on a fiscal path to health. now, i think most of us know here that we have to make some tough choices and it's going to require political will in order for us to address this. we've been avoiding this for years. expoo we're going to face a debt-induced catastrophe if we don't address it and drean addrt soon. so when you're faced with this kind of fiscal mess, what do you do? well, what families and pise businesses all across america have had to do when they face these types of situations is sit down, create a budget, put themselves back on a path to balance and to prosperity on and to avoid the inevitable, a collapse of the family budget or the business budget. our communities and states have had to do this, and we see this happening everywhere except in washington. it is this body and this
a campaign on jobs and the economy, jobbing and the economy, jobs and the economy and beat that drum until i beat people into sleep. that's part of it, all right, but all of the rest of this has to be added together, or we can never reconstruct this country. we will not get the pillars of american exceptionalism back together. [applause] unless we have the full spectrum. if we can restore our families and strengthen our faith and protect innocent, unborn human life instead of assaulting it with a half a billion dollars appropriated to planned parenthood in a single year. that's gotta go. obamacare has got to go. [cheers and applause] we can't let up on obamacare and believe that somehow we're going to capitulate to that side because the roads are vitality, and it is an unconstitutional taking of god-given american liberty, and it's got to go. [cheers and applause] ronald reagan omelet me down a couple -- only let me down a couple of times in eight years. one of those was 1986, and i still had the dent after i heard on the news he had signed the amnesty act of 1986. but it was on the promise
to us that -- quote -- "the need to transform the world's energy economy while addressing global climate change is not only a religious and moral imperative, it is a strategy for security and survival. the united states conference of catholic bishops says that -- and i quote -- "at its core, global climate change is not about economic theory or political platforms, nor about partisan advantage or interest group pressures. it is about the future of god's creation and one human family." the bishops asked congress to consider seven principles in shaping responsible climate change policies. one, addressing global climate change means protecting the common good. two, climate change will hit the most vulnerable communities the hardest. three, we must seek solutions that enhance rather than diminish the economic standing of the poor. four, new resources must be made available to poor communities to adapt to the effects of a changing climate. five, we must protect vulnerable people from the negative human health effects of climate change. six, local affected communities should have a voi
requirement to have a -- growth perspective of employers. mr. deputy speaker, a vital sector for our economy and the cost of doing business is energy. creating a low carbon economy is done by create jobs rather than -- was a major step forward for new nuclear. today with help of we are also announcing our intelligence to take two projects to the next stage of development will support the manufacture of mission vessels in britain with new takes incentive and the honorable members has urged do you passionately and in a nonpartisan way about the damage of doing the famous ceramic industry and persuaded me we will exempt from next year the industrial processes for the industry and others from the climate change. [cheering and applause] [laughter] >> for the we will this year sign contracts for the commissioning relief, the expectations of which is already increasing investment. i want britain to tap to new sources of local energy like shale gas. i'm introducing a tax -- including a shale gas field allowance to promote early investment. shale gas is part of the future and we'll make it happen. we
in jobs in the economy, and closes loopholes and preserves the middle class' ability to grow and proceed. so, we now are, you know, in this 30-hour thing. we could actually be debating the budget while those 30 hours tick. we don't have to be sitting here doing nothing. and one of our colleagues said, he'd like to debate the budget two weeks from now. why is he putting things off? well, i guess if i had their budget and looked at it compared to our budget, that's what i'd want to do. but that's not fair and that's not right. so i just came to the floor to join my colleague from washington in pleading with our colleagues, let's have a real debate on the budget. the lines are squarely -- are sharply drawn. our budget and your budget contrast. let the american people hear the debate and decide who they like. we're pretty confident they'd like ours better. you no longer have the talking point, we don't have a budget. so instead you're preventing us from talking about our budget. it is not fair, not right, and doesn't really help the process. so i would hope that i know there are some members
will we see the economy take off, mr. norquist? >> guest: okay. we haven't had a trillion dollar in spending cuts what we had was an agreement by the president of the united states forced on him by the republicans to reduce spending over the next decade by a trillion dollars. so that's $100 billion a year. and those cuts haven't started happening yet. they're just beginning to kick in. the sequester is an additional $1.2 trillion over the decade. so what the republicans won in that big battle we had in 2011, the budget control act, was that obama wanted to keep spending, and he needed the debt ceiling to be increased because he'd spent so much money. and the republicans said, okay, we'll raise the debt ceiling is so the country doesn't default, but only if you agree to a dollar-for-dollar reduction in spending over the next decade. and so we got $2.5 trillion in spending restraint. not real cuts, spending less than obama had hoped in. in washington that's called a cut. if you wanted ten of something and you only got eight of something, you go i got cut too. actually, you walked a
democracy. it will soon be one of the world's largest economies. its involvement in asia will be a welcomed addition. the u.s. must work with india to reduce her domestic constraints to growth and increase foreign direct investment, reducing red tape, increasing the supply of electricity, improving the tax system, strengthening the ability to enforce contracts will all live in the is ranking and spur business growth in a way that has been missing thus far. since asia's economy is largely based on global supply chains, it is absolutely critical for india to enact reforms, to liberalize its economy, to tap into this regional market. this is out in the anchors itself in the asia-pacific region, and we should do what we can to help leverage those reforms inside india. that is why i believe the administration must redouble its efforts to secure a u.s.-india bilateral investment treaty. current negotiations are proceeding far too slowly. there are important issues to resolve. it's going to take a concerted effort to make progress, but once the vat is firmly in place, the u.s. should work with ind
, an international launch industry that's far from robust. now, our economy depends on the ability to create and instantly distribute vast amounts of data around the planet. space-based platforms have become a vital link in the national and global economies, and they're essential to the prediction of weather, navigation in all forms of transportation, the operation of power grids, the completion of local and global financial transactions and communication to mobile platforms whether they be on land, sea or air. commercial satellite industry also plays a critical role in supporting government operations. commercial satellites supply the majority of communications in afghanistan and iraq. today our satellites are still flying almost all of the dod's unmanned aerial vehicles, and we're providing the vast majority of the navy's communications at sea. to address the challenges that i mentioned earlier, the leading space operation, operators have gotten together on a number of complex cooperative projects, probably the most significant of these is the space data association or sda. the formation o
. after i do a marco rubio here. [laughter] [laughter] the war has effected the economy as well, and left us with a legacy of high oil prices and higher national debt. and the iraq war -- has far reaching consequences. i have been speaking up until now about budgetary cost, of course there are vast costs to civil society both here and iraq and economic costs and financial costs. some of the costs that i'm now going talk about are costs that are born by individuals and society or society at large rather than directly by the government. the first -- there are many of these costs i can talk about. let me highlight a couple. first, if we think back to when we invaded iraq in 2003, oil prices were $25 a barrel and we had been at that level for more than two decades, and the futures market, which take in to account already increase from demand of china predicted oil prices would remain in that range for the next decade. oil prices are complicated but most experts agree that iraq was one of the triggers that lead to oil prices shooting up shortly after the innovation. oil prices peaked at $14 0
to make sure that we're growing our economy and that we're strengthening our middle class. and as i said at my state of the unigallon address last month, every day we should be asking ourselves three questions. one, how do we make sure america's a magnet for good jobs. number two, how do we quip people with the skills they need to get those jobs and, number three, how do we make sure that hard work actually pays off in a decent living. these are the challenges that i've instructed my team here at the white house and in my entire cabinet to focus on. and a position that's instrumental to tackling these challenges is having an outstanding secretary of labor. so i want to begin by thanking hilda solis and her entire team. [applause] including acting secretary harris. [applause] for the outstanding work that they've been doing over the past four years. their efforts at the department of labor have given more young people a chance to we were new skills, more returning vets the chance to find a job, they've looked out for worker safety from construction sites to coal mines, they've stood up fo
of the most important things we can do for our country and for our economy. the amendment that's being offered would undermine the effort under way to bring health insurance to millions of currently uninsured people in a fiscally responsible fashion, so i urge our colleagues to oppose this amendment and i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. vote: vote: the presiding officer: are there any senators wishing to vote or change their vote? if not, the ayes are 45, the nays are 54. the amendment is not agreed to. a senator: move to reconsider. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. murray: move to lay on the table. the presiding officer: without objection. under the previous order, there will be two minutes equally divided prior to a vote on amendment 438 offered by the senator from new hampshire, mrs. shaheen. mrs. shaheen: mr. president, the senate is not in order. the presiding officer: the senate is not in order. senators please take their conversations out of the well. mrs. shaheen: amendment
. after five years, let's build it. this is energy, this is jobs, this is getting our economy going and growing, and this is making sure we don't have to import oil from the middle east. and i.t. not just oil from canada. it is oil from the great state of north dakota and montana -- light, sweet crude is what we need to get to our refineries. please join knee i me in voting. the presiding officer: does the senator call up the amendment? mr. hoeven: i call up the amendment. the clerk: the senator proposes amendment number 494. the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: i yield to the senator california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, the handwrite something on the wall. i see it. but i do feel when my colleague argued against my amendment -- and he was quite successful -- he didn't say -- it was not an accurate ampleght th argument. the fact is, his amendment has already made the decision for us that everything is hungy ambassadorrhung -- hunkydory wi. we don't know how much of the steel will be american. we don't know how many of the jobs will be american. we don't
are as montanans. 50% of montana's economy is tied to ranching and farming, supporting one in five jobs in montana. i had the privilege to grow up on a ranch outside helena, montana. it taught me firsthand the values of hard work, faith, family and doing what's right. those are the values i take to me with work every day. paul harvey, who got his start in broadcasting in montana, said it best in this poem, "so god made a farmer." "god looked down on the earth he created and said i need a caretaker for this world i made. and so god made a farmer. so as part of trying to bridge that divide between washington, d.c. and montana, i honor the strong legacy of farming and ranching montanans in montana by celebrating national ag day. those montana families involved in agriculture is so much more than a livelihood. it is a way of life. i'm honored to represent so many ranchers, so many farmers from montana who have dedicated their life to the land, providing the service that everyone in the world benefits from. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from kansas. mr.
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)